Lena Dunham’s Endometriosis Story May Sound Familiar To 5 Million Women

By Anna Almendrala

Lena Dunham attends The Hollywood Reporter's Women in Entertainment Breakfast at Milk Studios on Dec. 9, 2015 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Lena Dunham attends The Hollywood Reporter’s Women in Entertainment Breakfast at Milk Studios on Dec. 9, 2015 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Lena Dunham, the creator of the HBO series “Girls,” announced Monday that she isn’t going to do any press for her TV show’s upcoming season. The reason? Endometriosis, a chronic and often painful disorder in which the endometrium, the tissue that lines the interior of the uterus, spreads beyond the organ. It can grow on other organs throughout the pelvic region, and then when it comes time for a woman’s period, the displaced endometrium “sheds” blood and tissue but has nowhere to go.
“I am currently going through a rough patch with the illness and my body (along with my amazing doctors) let me know, in no uncertain terms, that it’s time to rest,” Dunham wrote in an Instagram post. “That’s a hard thing to do, but I’m trying, because all I want is to make season 6 of Girls the best one yet.”

Hey Beloved Pals, I just wanted to let you know that, while I am so excited for Girls to return on Feb 21, I won’t be out and about doing press for the new season. As many of you know I have endometriosis, a chronic condition that affects approximately 1 in 10 women’s reproductive health. I am currently going through a rough patch with the illness and my body (along with my amazing doctors) let me know, in no uncertain terms, that it’s time to rest. That’s a hard thing to do, but I’m trying, because all I want is to make season 6 of Girls the best one yet. I’m lucky enough to have support and backup from Jenni, Judd and the whole Girls gang. So many women with this disease literally don’t have the option of time off and I won’t take it for granted. Wishing you all health & happiness, in whatever form suits you. Back soon xxLena

A photo posted by Lena Dunham (@lenadunham) on Feb 8, 2016 at 12:42pm PST

The condition, which affects an estimated five million women in the U.S., can be very painful and cause scarring, cysts and irritation. Because it can scar fallopian tubes, prevent the implantation of a pregnancy and change egg quality, endometriosis is also linked to fertility problems. Thirty to 50 percent of women with an infertility diagnosis have the disorder, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

Treatment for endometriosis can include pain medications if symptoms are mild, the birth control pill or another hormonal treatments, and surgery. The best treatment for endometriosis-related infertility is in vitro fertilization, or IVF.

Dunham is already an outspoken advocate for women with endometriosis. In her 2014 memoir Not That Kind Of Girl, she wrote that the pain of endometriosis initially felt like “someone had poured a drop of vinegar inside of me, followed by a sprinkle of baking soda. It bubbled and fizzed and went where it would.”

She said she went on to have …read more

Source: More Fitness

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