Wellness

Menstruation, hysteria, masturbation — 19th century adolescence had it all. In 1878 The Physical Life of Woman: Advice to the Maiden, Wife, and Mother by Dr. George H. Napheys was published. The book was basically a how-to guide for girls and women for everything from puberty to getting married and having children. In this manual, the doctor outlines best practices for raising a virtuous young woman through several important stages of her life. Take this quiz and see if you can guess what puberty was like in the 19th century! Getty Images [...]
Thu, Nov 23, 2017
Source: Health
Have a roundtable discussion about all the things you give no fucks about.
Some people have Friends marathons, others grill on their deck like it’s the Fourth of July. AKA your closest friends. The people who aren't actually family, but MIGHT AS WELL BE. We asked the BuzzFeed Community to tell us about their chosen family holiday traditions. Some were funny, others were heartwarming, and a couple were just plain random AF. Let's get into them! Have a roundtable discussion about all the things you give no fucks about. My friends and I celebrate what we lovingly call Nofucksgiving. It's a Thanksgiving dinner where we get together and eat and talk about all the things we don't give a fuck about. It's one of my favorite holidays, and it's so cathartic. We may not give a fuck about a lot of things, but we sure do care about each other. —lakewrm NBC / Via readeroffictions.com Host a judgement-free karaoke night. Me (trans*), my actual sister who is gay, and a handful of our closest queer friends — who all find the holidays a little rough because of tense family situations — get together the Saturday before Christmas. We order pizza and drink beer and exchange gifts and watch Home Alone, and usually have a drunk Christmas song lip sync contest somewhere in there. It's probably the thing I most look forward to at the holidays. Just good wholesome fun with the people who I know love me the most — who I can be myself around and be wholly comfortable with. There's no worrying about offending someone with my very existence at my very conservative family gatherings! Plus, the pizza and beer make a great break from the typical holiday food everyone eats during this time of year. —amietb Columbia Pictures / Via giphy.com Throw an early Friendsgiving and keep the day itself low-key. My husband and I have not-so-great relationships with our actual families. We don't feel like forcing Thanksgiving with them is necessary. So the Saturday before Thanksgiving we do Friendsgiving, and on Thanksgiving day we watch the Friends episodes about their Thanksgivings and hang up all Christmas decor. We do this every year. —glittersniffers NBC / Via giphy.com Say grace...but like, not actually "grace." We like to say “grace.” Basically we all do a shot after loudly announcing the word "grace." —taylormariem49a0efb48 youtube.com / Via imgur.com Complete a winter-themed puzzle together. Years ago, in my first apartment, my roommates and I would do Christmas puzzles together. Towards the beginning of December we'd go shopping together and each choose a a winter-themed puzzle. Then, we'd put them out on our kitchen table to casually work on over time. We didn't always get the chance to sit down to work on them as a group, but it was cool to see the puzzle gradually come together and think of each other having contributed at some point. The puzzles would usually last past Christmas and help [...]
Wed, Nov 22, 2017
Source: Health
You want your holiday meals to look good and taste great. But let’s be honest, EASY is important too. Plus, vegetarian. BuzzFeed News / Via Getty Images Some people like to cook big fancy meals for the holidays. You are NOT that person. Not that you wouldn't mind one or two fancy dishes in any given meal, but every. single. one? Nope. Plus, every kitchen shrinks in size as soon as you start cooking multiple dishes, as tends to happen during holiday meals. So to give you a break, we rounded up bunch of different recipes that each can be made in single pot. That's right. ONE, which means fewer dirty dishes. And these recipes don't have to be made in a pot on your stove per se —some are for your slow cooker, instant pot, or a sheet pan that can be popped in the oven. So fire up a bunch of these recipes in different parts of your kitchen for (relatively) easy holiday entertaining. reddit.com / Via giphy.com Maple Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts If you're not a fan of Brussel sprouts this recipe should change your mind. You roast your veggies with extra virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, a touch of garlic and maple syrup, which gives them a slightly sweeter taste. Toasted pecans add crunch, and you also get chewy goodness from dried cranberries, which you add just before tossing and serving. Here's the recipe. Kristine's Kitchen / Via kristineskitchenblog.com Instant Pot Cranberry Sauce With a Touch of Apple Brandy Who doesn't love fresh cranberry sauce? And this recipe delivers a more nuanced flavor because it includes apples, orange juice, orange zest, cardamom, cinnamon, sweetener (maple syrup is one option), and a bit of apple brandy, (although that's optional). And this juicy-tart dish is ready in JUST SIX MINUTES if you use your Instant Pot. Here's the recipe. Healthyslowcooking / Via healthyslowcooking.com Instant Pot Mashed Potatoes It's not really a holiday meal without mashed potatoes is it? Well this year get your taters done in six minutes by using your Instant Pot. Although this recipe calls for chicken stock, use vegetable stock to make it vegetarian friendly. Here's the recipe. Eatwell101 / Via eatwell101.com Sautéed Green Beans With Garlic This recipe couldn't be easier and calls for only a handful of ingredients including green beans, olive oil, garlic, sea salt, and the juice and zest of one lemon. With a prep time of 2 minutes and cook time of 8 minutes, you can get this delicious dish on the table in 10 minutes. Here's the recipe. Unsophisticatedcook / Via unsophisticook.com Easy One Pan Cauliflower "Mac" & Cheese This one-pan "mac" and cheese will be a hit with both kids and adults. You'll need one head of cauliflower, garlic powder, smoked paprika, cream cheese, cheddar cheese, grated Parmesan, and a [...]
Tue, Nov 21, 2017
Source: Health
Ashley Black Guru / Via youtube.com The entrepreneur behind a tool designed to massage skin aggressively in order to break up cellulite is accused of "false advertising" and "gross negligence" in a lawsuit filed in California that is seeking class action status.A group of 10 plaintiffs accused Ashley Black and her company of failing to address the alleged side effects of using the FasciaBlaster, an $89 tool sold on Amazon and elsewhere that claims to "diminish cellulite" and "blast away subcutaneous fat."The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, argues that not only does the product “fail to deliver the aesthetic results stridently guaranteed” by the company, but that it causes a “wide array of physical injuries” including bruising, hormonal instability and strokes. When people complained about their FasciaBlaster experiences in a Facebook support group, which included more than 300,000 members, Black's company responded with harassment and cyberbullying, the lawsuit asserts.The company told BuzzFeed News that the allegations in "this frivolous lawsuit" are "nothing more than a shakedown effort.” The company added that "judging by the false statements in the complaint" it expected "an expedient dismissal."The lawsuit follows a BuzzFeed News story that first reported on controversy over the company's cellulite and fat-busting device and its recommended usage techniques. The FasciaBlaster has prompted 62 reports of injury and product malfunction submitted to the FDA since October 2016, with complaints that include bruising, weight gain, and digestive issues.FasciaBlaster users are told to heat up in a sauna, slather themselves in oil, and rigorously massage with the tool up to four times a week to purportedly break up cellulite. Bruising, according to Black, is a sign of restoring “unhealthy fascia."But medical professionals told BuzzFeed News that these claims were not backed by firm science. Doctors said there was little evidence that massaging permanently destroys cellulite, which is created by fat compressed between a web of benign tissue between the skin and muscle called fascia.John Morton, chief of bariatric and minimally invasive surgery at Stanford Health Care, told BuzzFeed News that a bruise is essentially a collection of blood beneath the skin and it does "not equal fascia being broken up.”Although Black asserts that the FasciaBlaster doesn't bruise healthy tissue when properly used, Morton noted that “any skin can get bruised. It doesn't matter if it's healthy or not.”Perrin F. Disner, the attorney representing the plaintiffs, told BuzzFeed News that Black's company's behavior "is morally reprehensible.""It's bad enough when some new beauty fad fails to provide the advertised results — junkyards are brimming with every pricey gimmick that overpromised and underperformed," he said."Worse, though, is when you wish that the latest gadget had merely failed to do what it was supposed to, because now you're also very sick, while the company claims there have been no complaints and tells 300,000+ people to ignore you because you're just a lying troll," Disner added.Plaintiffs in the suit describe nausea, fatigue, body aches, and depression immediately following their use of the FasciaBlaster tool and protocols. Sue [...]
Tue, Nov 21, 2017
Source: Health
Think about what holiday-specific triggers you might run into so you can put some coping mechanisms in place.
Invaluable advice from people who have been there. So to help you get through — and actually enjoy yourself — we asked members of the BuzzFeed Community, as well as Dr. Dena Cabrera, certified eating disorders specialist and Executive Clinical Director of the Rosewood Center for Eating Disorders, for their best tips. Think about what holiday-specific triggers you might run into so you can put some coping mechanisms in place. In addition to the actual food that's present during the holidays, there are also a lot of other factors at play, says Cabrera. For example, more so than any other time of the year, holidays come with this pressure to ~indulge~ and eat a lot more than you normally would. Not to mention, all the difficulties being around family can bring — parents fretting over whether/how you're eating and making you feel watched, uninvited comments from relatives, even just an overwhelming environment in general. If you start by thinking through what problems you might run into, you can adjust your expectations and hopefully be ready for them, says Cabrera. Nickelodeon / Via giphy.com Make a plan ahead of time with your therapist, physician, nutritionist, or whoever else makes up your support team. "Last holiday season was my first one in recovery and it wasn't easy at all. Both my nutritionist and therapist were incredibly supportive and they helped me plan ahead so I could have emotional resources and feel comfortable towards my diet in those days." —betsy2v FOX / Via giphy.com If you are worried about there being "safe" foods available, offer to bring a side dish you feel comfortable eating. —shaynac425ac70a2 instagram.com Let go of the notion that the holidays mean you should be happy. All the holiday-themed commercials and decorations and movies and music emphasize that this should be the most magical time of the year, and that in and of itself can be a huge trigger for people. "When we don't have that kind of family or environment or support, we compare ourselves and set ourselves up for disappointment and feeling even worse," says Cabrera. So go easy on yourself — a picture-perfect holiday isn't realistic. Thinkstock / Sally Tamarkin / Via buzzfeed.com Tell your family what comments and phrases make you uncomfortable. "I ask my family to steer clear of triggers such as ‘you look well' or ‘well done' after finishing a meal." —imogend47b4aa2a5 This primer on what not to say about food during Thanksgiving might be a helpful resource to show them. Chris Ritter / BuzzFeed / Via buzzfeed.com Do all your favorite self-care activities in the days leading up to the food-centric holiday. "I'll spend time alone meditating, hit the gym, go for a mani/pedi and journal. On the actual day of the holiday, I make sure to eat a healthy breakfast and go for a run or take a workout class [...]
Tue, Nov 21, 2017
Source: Health
The holidays are a time to enjoy food and people you love — but a nasty bout of food poisoning can ruin all of the cheer.
Repeat after me: don’t wash the turkey. The holidays are a time to enjoy food and people you love — but a nasty bout of food poisoning can ruin all of the cheer. When it comes to holiday meals, there's definitely one guest you don't want at your dinner table: food-borne illness. It happens when disease-causing germs or harmful toxins contaminate the food we eat. The most common food-borne germs in the US are Salmonella, norovirus, Campylobacter, Clostridium perfringens, and Staphylococcus aureus. The typical symptoms of food-borne illness (also referred to as food poisoning) include diarrhea, vomiting, and cramping and they can start anywhere from hours to days after you eat the contaminated food. Most of the time, food-borne illnesses will go away in a few days and medical treatment isn't necessary. But people with weaker immune systems — pregnant women, the elderly, chemotherapy patients — are at higher risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that each year about 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) get sick and 3,000 die from food-borne illnesses. Cartoon Network / Via giphy.com Fortunately, there are some simple rules you can follow to reduce the risk of food-borne illness and make sure your cooking doesn't make everyone else ill. Thanksgiving presents a lot of opportunities for food to get contaminated and make people sick. Cooks (both seasoned and inexperienced) are preparing a bunch of different of foods they don't normally make and for a large number of people. There's usually a raw turkey involved, which is much bigger and difficult to cook than your average chicken. And food generally sits out for a longer time and leftovers are eaten days, if not weeks, after the meal. So, what are the most common cooking mistakes that lead to food-borne infections and how can you avoid them? We reached out to germ expert Kelly Reynolds, associate professor of environmental health at the University of Arizona, and consulted the most recent Thanksgiving food safety guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to find out. Maren Caruso / Getty Images / Via gettyimages.com Do not cook if you're sick — or at least get some help and wear gloves. So you spent weeks planning the menu, shopping at different grocery stores, and finding Pinterest recipes — and come Thanksgiving day, you wake up sick as a dog. But the feast must go on, right? Yes, but you should get someone to fill in for you or help out. “You want to minimize the chances that you contaminate the food or surfaces that your guests will come into contact with,” Reynolds says. But the type of illness matters, too. If you're sick with any kind of contagious stomach bug, you really shouldn't cook. "If you don't wash your hands properly after using the bathroom (which most people don't), you can easily contaminate the food you're cooking [...]
Tue, Nov 21, 2017
Source: Health