Wellness

Static stretching before a workout probably isn't a great idea.
Because no one likes a pulled hammie. Static stretching before a workout probably isn't a great idea. The point of a warm-up is to prepare your body to exercise, but unfortunately, static stretching — lengthening a muscle till you feel a pull or minor discomfort and holding the position for about 30 seconds — can't get the job done. "Static stretching before exercise has been shown to actually increase injury risk while decreasing performance," Jason Fitzgerald, USATF-certified coach and founder of Strength Running explains to BuzzFeed Health via email. "Plus, it doesn't accomplish the goals of a warm-up: increasing heart rate, perspiration, and blood flow while lubricating joints and increasing muscle temperature." But that's where a dynamic warm-up — like the moves below — come in. They will get your body ready to work out. They were selected by Fitzgerald for BuzzFeed's 4 Weeks to 5K Challenge (which, btw, you can sign up for anytime), so they're specifically awesome for cardio workouts, but you can use them to warm up before any exercise. (If you're doing any heavy lifting, you'll want add some more specific moves to prep you to move heavy weight, like these.) Jacoblund / Getty Images Donkey kicks Get on all fours with your wrists under your shoulders and knees under your hips. Keeping your knee bent at 90 degrees, lift one leg behind you until it reaches hip height. Squeeze your glutes and keep your foot flexed and your back straight. Do 15 reps, then switch sides and repeat. Caity Arthur / BuzzFeed Single-leg deadlift With a slight bend in the knee of your weight-bearing leg, pull your shoulders back and keep your hips squared as you hinge at the hips, bending over and reaching toward the floor. Keep your back flat. Reach until you feel a slight stretch in your hamstring. Do 15 reps, then switch sides and repeat. Caity Arthur / BuzzFeed View Entire List › [...]
Wed, Mar 29, 2017
Source: Health
Your wakefulness depends on it. [...]
Wed, Mar 29, 2017
Source: Health
Darren Mccollester / Getty Images The pain medication OxyContin has been widely blamed for setting off the opioid epidemic, one in which more than 15,000 people in the United States fatally overdosed on prescription painkillers in 2015 alone.Now, the drug's maker, Purdue Pharma, is starting a study that asks chronic pain patients to log their symptoms on iPhones and Apple Watches, so their doctors can keep tabs on them and, ideally, decrease or eliminate their medications.Purdue plans to partner with Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania, a state that has been hard-hit by opioid abuse, to recruit hundreds of patients this summer for a yearlong study. Purdue began experimenting with ResearchKit, Apple's software framework for clinical trial apps, in 2015. This is Purdue's first official foray into remote health-monitoring technology.Researchers at Purdue and Geisinger hope that wearables and smartphones will help doctors better understand patients' real-time experiences, prescribe them painkillers only as needed, and cut health care costs. While some public health experts say the study potentially has merit, they acknowledge that Purdue's involvement can, at the very least, look awkward.“I'm just very suspicious that they're interested in developing a tool that will help people get off of their medicines,” said Andrew Kolodny, co-director of the Opioid Policy Research Collaborative at Brandeis University. “When I hear about this, I wonder if it's all an effort by Purdue to get good [public relations].”Robert Jamison, an anesthesia and psychiatry professor at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, said abuse of OxyContin “triggered some of the problems we're facing today.” He added of Purdue, “I'm sure they're looking for some positive press out of this, [so they can] say, ‘We're trying to make things better.'”“I know that sounds like, ‘What a crazy thing for a company that produces opioids to do,'” Tracy Mayne, Purdue's executive director of medical affairs strategic research, told BuzzFeed News. “But it comes from that level of commitment to addressing the problem in the US.” Family members hold pictures of loved ones killed by the opioid epidemic during a news conference on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong / Getty Images Since 1996, OxyContin has generated billions for Purdue. The private, family-owned pharmaceutical company aggressively marketed the drug and long held an outsized share of the market for extended-release prescription painkillers: Its patent on the original formula didn't expire until 2013. In 2007, top executives pleaded guilty to federal prosecutors' charges that it had misbranded OxyContin as less addictive than it actually was and misled regulators, doctors, and patients about its risks. Purdue was fined $635 million. Other lawsuits have since been filed.Purdue knew for decades that OxyContin's painkilling effect often tapered off hours before the advertised 12-hour mark — a problem that led many patients to become addicted, the Los Angeles Times reported last year. With OxyContin prescriptions falling in the US, the company's owners are now using some of the same old marketing tactics, from patient discounts to seminars training doctors to prescribe opioids, to [...]
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Health
“Thelma and Louise, cause they both bad bitches.” youtube.com 1. Baileys and Kahlúa "Because I'm coffee-colored and they get me into trouble." —Carson Catherine Spence, Facebook 2. Chesticles —josiebeanboo 3. Thelma and Louise "'Cause they both bad bitches." —abbeyk46b65c3a3 4. Nifflers "After seeing Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, I decided to call them Nifflers because while they may be small, they're still a pair of fantastic b®easts." —laurencrabtre 5. James and Oliver "My boobs are named James and Oliver after the twins who play Fred and George Weasley in Harry Potter." —bbw1995 giphy.com View Entire List › [...]
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Health
It has recently come to my attention that some people do a completely absurd thing: They rinse lemons before using them. Not just if they're going to put a slice in a drink, but even if they're just going to use little juice for, say, a salad dressing.A quick poll of friends and coworkers revealed that people are bitterly divided on this issue. Those who rinse think it's disgusting that people wouldn't rinse, and the non-rinsers think it's a big waste of time. Well, when life hands me a debate about lemons, I make some phone calls and fix myself a tall glass of sweet, refreshing journalism lemonade.First, I spoke to Jaydee Hanson, senior policy analyst for the Center for Food Safety, an organization that advocates a variety of agricultural issues, like trying to keep genetically modified apples out of supermarkets and encouraging popcorn producers to use bee-friendly pesticides.“Yes, lemons definitely should be washed,” Hanson told me. His reasoning was that the rind is chock-full of pesticides that could transfer to the lemon while cutting, or transfer onto your hands while you touch the rind. “In addition to having pesticides on them, they also have antibiotics on them,” Hanson continued. “Most people don't realize this. The EPA granted emergency use of antibiotics on citrus crops to prevent citrus greening.” Citrus greening is a bacterial disease passed along by bugs that has been plaguing US citrus crops in the last few years.Hanson admits that the amount of pesticides on a lemon isn't exactly deadly. “Are you going to die from it? Not unless you're allergic to the antibiotics.”Hmm. I know plenty of people who are allergic to antibiotics, and I've never heard of anyone having a reaction from eating fruit. If this sounds perhaps a little alarmist, you're not the only one thinking that. Lemons at the grocery store, touched by who knows how many germy hands. Katie Notopoulos / BuzzFeed News Jim Adaskaveg is a professor of plant pathology at the University of California, Riverside, who specifically studies post-harvest fruit problems and sanitizing fruit. His career is basically dedicated to whether or not you should rinse a lemon.To understand if you should rinse a lemon, you first have to understand what rinsing would actually accomplish. Are you really washing off those pesticides and antibiotics? Nope! “Most lemons in a supermarket are processed and treated and ready to be consumed,” Adaskaveg explained. Fruit is washed at a processing plant between the field and the supermarket. After lemons are washed, they're treated with a wax and a safe fungicide to keep them from getting moldy.And the wax means that any trace amount of pesticide residue is not really getting washed off anyway – at least not by a few seconds of rinsing.However, Adaskaveg still is in favor of rinsing. The reason? Germs from whoever touched them at the grocery store: the manager who set up the display, or a customer who test-squeezed a few. Or even you [...]
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Health
Each year, there are (on average) over 320,000 victims of rape and sexual assault in the US.
We’d like to share your stories with others who may have experienced something similar. Each year, there are (on average) over 320,000 victims of rape and sexual assault in the US. Nearly 1 in 5 women and 1 in 71 men have been the victim of rape or attempted rape, according to data from the CDC. Instagram: @thejohnnies / Via instagram.com The lasting psychological and physical impacts of sexual assault can be debilitating. Psychologically, this can include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, and feelings of shame, numbness, or isolation. Physically, victims might be forced to deal with sexually transmitted infections, unintended pregnancy, and loss of desire. rainn.org / Via Facebook: RAINN01 Victims of sexual assault may find it particularly difficult to imagine enjoying sex and intimacy again. That's why BuzzFeed Health wants to share your stories of healing, recovering, and relearning how to feel safe, sexual, and whole again. We want to hear how you reclaimed your body or overcame sexual dysfunction brought on by your assault — or if you're in the process of doing so now. Instagram: @consentnation_ / Via instagram.com What would you like to tell other victims of sexual assault about taking back control of your sexuality and your sex life? Maybe you found a professional, a group, or an online community that specialized in supporting survivors. Maybe you have some helpful advice for others who are feeling numb, shocked, or afraid. Maybe you found something that helped you appreciate and celebrate your body or put you back in touch with your sexuality. Or maybe you have some solid advice for learning how to trust and love again. Casey Gueren / Via BuzzFeed News View Entire List › [...]
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Health