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Chinese foot-binding is perceived today as unusual, gruesome, an antiquated fetish, an erotic tradition. For decades in China, young girls' bones were broken and their feet tightly bond in a painful process that would eventually make them appear more desirable to men, according to historians. Their deformed feet, known as lotus feet, were tucked into embroidered shoes and viewed as delicate and dainty. It was a way to show off their social status. It was, at the time, chic. One study, however, suggests that there was another reason girls were subjected to the practice ― and it wasn't all about beauty or sex. Research published in the book Bound Feet, Young Hands suggests that some women's feet had been bound at a very young age so they could be trained to sit still for hours and help create textiles and clothing for the family. “What's groundbreaking about our work is that [foot-binding was] not confined to the elite,” Laurel Bossen, the book's co-author, told HuffPost. The study, Bossen added, dispels the view that the goal was only to try to please men. To uncover this little-known history of foot-binding, Bossen and the book's co-author, researcher Hill Gates, interviewed over 1,800 elderly women in remote villages across China and found that foot-binding was widespread among peasant populations, shattering the belief that foot-binding was a status symbol of the elite. All the women surveyed were born when foot-binding was still an accepted tradition. It's unclear when the practice began exactly, but Bossen believes foot-binding in China goes back as far as 1,000 years. “As the last generation of these foot-bound women disappears, we fortunately managed to interview many of them,” Bossen told HuffPost. “There is no other body of data based on interviews with foot-bound women that is as comprehensive as this. It was really a last chance to do it.” The type of foot-binding practiced in rural communities was a form of discipline, the book argues. Mothers bound young girls' feet so they would stay still and work with their hands, creating yarn and spinning thread, among other things, which families could use or sell. “Women who bound their daughters' feet had their own interests in controlling the labor of young girls and young women,” she said. “We reject the view that women were exempted from work, treasuring their precious bound feet and not economically important. They developed hand skills and worked with their hands throughout their lives.” These new findings, Bossen believes, prove that women in rural areas who had bound feet didn't get the recognition they deserved. “Chinese women were contributing more to society than they received credit for,” she said of the rural women with bound feet. “They were making very important contributions in the form of textiles [that have] been undervalued and mostly just forgotten.” And while this new research suggests that this painful practice wasn't solely for men's desire, it doesn't make the practice any less oppressive. Bossen explained, “It robbed young girls and then women throughout their lives of their ability to do other things, to move [...]
Sat, May 27, 2017
Source: More Celeb News1
You may not think it, but there's a direct relationship between plunging your chopsticks into that white, quart-sized box of cheaply priced Chinese food — and a laborer diligently driving a spike to lay the railroad tracks that became the gateway to the American West. May, which is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, marks the anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. It was largely built by Chinese immigrants from 1864 to 1869, working at a grueling pace for less money than white workers. And these labor practices have an impact today on how much we're willing to pay for Chinese food ― rooted in a perception that Chinese labor is inherently “cheap,” historians say. The earliest Chinese restaurants in America were created for Chinese railroad laborers, who were under contract and lacked negotiating power as they laid tracks from Omaha, Nebraska, to Sacramento, California ― cutting through the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. With Chinese laborers earning an estimated two-thirds of what white workers made, owners had to keep restaurant prices low, Beatrice Chen, programming vice president at the Museum of Chinese in America, explained to HuffPost. The mainstream American consumer mindset is that there is a ceiling to how much we’re willing to pay for Chinese food. “This perception of Chinese restaurants has stuck, even though high-end Chinese restaurants in Asia are common and popular,” Chen said. “The mainstream American consumer mindset is that there is a ceiling to how much we're willing to pay for Chinese food, even if they are made with the same fresh ingredients and intricate cooking techniques as say, French or Japanese cuisine.” ‘Cheap Labor' And ‘Job Stealers' The railroad also laid the foundation for perceptions of Chinese people themselves. White workers at the time were unionizing, and were less willing to work for lower wages. Railroad executives had been skeptical of the aptitude of Chinese workers, but the laborers set out to prove them wrong, Chen explained. “This led to the general perception that Chinese were willing to work for lower wages and were job stealers,” she said. But what was perceived as a robotic work ethic might have just been survival, Beth Lew-Williams, an assistant professor at Princeton specializing in Asian American history, told HuffPost in an interview in December. She pointed out a discriminatory labor system within the railroad. Chinese were paid less, given the worst strenuous jobs. People against the Chinese saw this as revealing of their innate nature. “It was a race-based dual wage system at the time,” Lew-Williams said. “Chinese were paid less, given the worst strenuous jobs. People against the Chinese saw this as revealing of their innate nature. That Chinese were fundamentally ‘cheap' labor and designed to do this back-breaking labor.” On top of negative perceptions, Chinese contributions were largely erased through history. Chen said that of the 17,000 railroad workers, 15,000 were Chinese, though estimates vary. A photo below of the final stake being driven into the track at [...]
Fri, May 26, 2017
Source: More Celeb News1
We can DEFINITELY relate to this... Scarlett Moffatt at Virgin TV British Academy Television Awards 2017, Press Room, Royal Festival Hall, London 14 May 2017Scarlett Moffatt is known for being one of the most down-to-earth celebs around. With her Geordie humour and quick wit, the former Gogglebox star has basically become a national treasure. And her latest social media post has proved once again why we all love her so much. Taking to Instagram, the I’m A Celeb winner was all of us when posted a photo of herself posing next to US super model, actress and general stunner, Emily Ratajkowski. Read: All the Latest Celebrity News  After a day of sunbathing in this glorious weather we’ve been having, the 26-year-old can be seen in a peachy t-shirt and a cap looking a slight shade of pink herself. We feel you Scarlett… While Emily is looking super sultry on a beach somewhere tropical with perfect make up and a perfect pout. Next to the comparison photo Scarlett joked: ‘Other girls sexy summer face vs my sexy summer face (sweaty and red) #summer #sunbathing’. Other girls sexy summer face vs my sexy summer face (sweaty and red) ☀️ #summer #sunbathing A post shared by Scarlett Moffatt (@scarlett_moffatt) on May 26, 2017 at 2:15am PDT And fans of the Geordie lass were clearly impressed as the pic racked up a massive 52k likes in a few hours. Some of her 1.4million followers were also quick to praise Scar with hundreds rushing to comment on the pic. ‘Yours is more natural and still pretty x’, one impressed follower wrote. More: Charlotte Crosby shares Instagram photo and reveals she’s lost FIVE pounds in THREE days! Another gushed: ‘Lol actually love this!!! And it’s so true. You are so down to earth…we love it @scarlett_moffatt xx‘. A third agreed: ‘Why is this so relatable?’ While a fourth added: ‘@scarlett_moffatt #keepingitreal’. Agreed! The presenter also sent her Insta followers into a spin last week when she wowed fans with her incredible figure at the BAFTA Awards. Choosing to go for a black mini-dress with laced star detailing, the telly star was all smiles as she posed with mum, Betty at the star-studded red-carpet event. Wish it was the BAFTAs again this weekend #bafta #mother #daughter #love A post shared by Scarlett Moffatt (@scarlett_moffatt) on May 20, 2017 at 3:37am PDT But as well as pointing out how AH-mazing Scar looked, fans just couldn’t believe Betty’s glam makeover as one fan wrote: ‘Can I just say your mum looks amazing. Obviously you always do. Xx’, while another added: ‘Your mum looks gorgeous x’. Style is clearly in the Moffatt genes! The post ‘Keeping it real!’ Scarlett Moffatt praised by fans after posting THIS hilarious sunbathing photo appeared first on CelebsNow. [...]
Fri, May 26, 2017
Source: Celeb News
Developers and real estate agents thought that they could come into the lower area of Harlem and dub it “SoHa,” short for South Harlem. As far as residents are concerned, they thought wrong. NY1 reports that developers want to refer to the area between 110th and 125th Streets to make it more trendy, similar to SoHo. During a press conference on Wednesday, local leaders rejected the name, saying that it was insulting the culturally rich neighborhood and whitewashes the historically black community. They said the name change would only welcome more high-end developers and wealthy white people, leading to the displacement of long-time residents. “How dare someone try to rob our culture, and try to act as if we were not here, and create a new name, a new reality as if the clock started when other people showed up?” state Senator-elect Brian Benjamin said. A post shared by Inside Harlem™ | Harlem USA (@insideharlem) on May 24, 2017 at 1:18pm PDT The name “SoHa” first appeared in a New York Times story in 1999, according to NY1. Since then, it has increasingly appeared on real estate websites like StreetEasy. Realtor Keller Williams recently dedicated a “SoHa” team in the neighborhood. “We're not going to let people who just got here change the name of our community for their profit,” Harlem District Leader Cordell Cleare said. “This is about greed and lust.” A post shared by Inside Harlem™ | Harlem USA (@insideharlem) on May 24, 2017 at 2:38pm PDT Community Board 10 member and real estate broker Danni Tyson said profit is possible without rebranding the neighborhood.“This is Harlem — a wonderful brand, a brand that is known all over this world,” she said. “No real estate company, no coffee shop, no business should be using the term ‘SoHa' to refer to Harlem. This is a home, this is a culture, this is a place that people visit,” she continued in the video above. In addition to residents protesting, folks on social media are less than enthused about the proposed name change. SoHa!?!? Harlem Residents Fuming Over Push to Rename the Area https://t.co/DzxgLVUCgu pic.twitter.com/az7LDWjt2E— Anoa C. ❤ (@TheWayWithAnoa) May 25, 2017 @Phil_Lewis_ Erase the historical significance of "Harlem" + new name + White faces= #gentrification— Ms. Aishia (@divatherapist) May 26, 2017 That's right! NOBODY should be saying shit like "SoHa" etc... It's #Harlem. The end. STOP trying to erase POC + their history for https://t.co/8pIaEWODqW— Mark Sundstrom (@106th) May 25, 2017 SOHA ISN'T A THING. IT IS HARLEM. https://t.co/RXsAjPRdKS— Sandra E. Garcia (@S_Evangelina) May 25, 2017 SoHa? = #Harlem pic.twitter.com/PsclNXAkjx— Anika Noni Rose (@AnikaNoniRose) May 26, 2017 So they wanna name Harlem...SoHa? Who are these white people and are they the same people remaking Dirty Dancing?!— Jenni Ruiza (@RuizaJenni) May 26, 2017 Benjamin said he's working [...]
Fri, May 26, 2017
Source: More Celeb News1
A wrestler sets his sights on the NCAA championship; a man goes on a statewide search for his missing son. A trends forecaster learns to cope with the market's return to IRL experiences; an ex-musician reflects on his glory days. The journeys — both literal and metaphorical — that make up this summer's new titles will move you. Below are a few of the books we're most looking forward to in the coming months. Woman No. 17 by Edan Lepucki In LA, “the beauty's in the tap water.” At least that what memoirist Lady Daniels says when S., the woman she's hired to care for her young son while she works, arrives at her door, looking plainer than she'd expected. But she grows close to S. amid the heat of the Hollywood summer. -Maddie Crum, Books and Culture Writer Buy it on Amazon, or at your local bookstore. New People by Danzy Senna The award-winning author of Caucasia is publishing her first novel in over 10 years this summer: a striking, off-kilter exploration of race and class. Biracial graduate student Maria lives in Brooklyn with her fiancé Khalil, also biracial, where they've ensconced themselves in a bourgeois, racially mixed community of intellectuals. Maria finds herself falling into an unrequited obsession with a black poet that threatens to shatter her relationship, her reputation, and her fragile mental state. -Claire Fallon, Books and Culture Writer Buy it on Amazon, or at your local bookstore. Who Is Rich? by Matthew Klam Sixteen years ago (!), Matthew Klam wrote a collection of much-anthologized stories. He hasn't published a book since then, so Who Is Rich?, his first novel, actually earns the perhaps hackneyed label of “highly anticipated.” The book follows Rich, a struggling cartoonist, and Amy, a painting student, through their dangerous liaisons at an artist's retreat. -MC Buy it on Amazon, or at your local bookstore. The Locals by Jonathan Dee Dee, the author of several previous novels, including 2010's The Privileges, has plenty of experience analyzing the perils of wealth and power. The Locals promises a particularly timely twist, featuring a white working class community in Massachusetts that elects a millionaire expat from New York City as its mayor. Can he save them from economic decline, or will his radically conservative policies wreak havoc ― and what will the new regime mean for the community? -CF Buy it on Amazon, or at your local bookstore. Stephen Florida by Gabe Habash In his debut book about athleticism and obsession, Habash follows the titular character on his journey to become an NCAA-winning college wrestler. Even if you're not a sports fan, the prose is dizzyingly good. -MC Buy it on Amazon, or at your local bookstore. Eastman Was Here by Alex Gilvarry Gilvarry's second novel takes us back to the 1970s, as a dissolute, once-prominent writer attempts to deal with his atrophied career and an unexpected separation from his wife. Hoping to prove himself once again, to his critics and to the wife he routinely cheated on, he decides to [...]
Fri, May 26, 2017
Source: More Celeb News1
You won't believe what these celebs were selling Mandatory Credit: Photo by Buckner/Variety/REX/Shutterstock (8840654r) David Beckham amfAR's 24th Cinema Against AIDS Gala, Auction, 70th Cannes Film Festival, France - 25 May 2017For the past week the world has been watching as Hollywood’s A-list stars descend the South of France to attend the ultra swanky events and exclusive parties of Cannes Film Festival. (We’re not jealous at all…) But as this year’s star-studded bash comes to an end, it was time for the event everyone in the celeb world has been waiting for – the annual amfAR dinner. Read: All the Latest Celebrity News  Now, if you haven’t heard of the amfAR – it’s basically the biggest, fanciest party you can imagine where all the top stars help to persuade the super-rich to part with their cash in a charity auction for AIDS research. And it is MEGA. Fancy sipping cocktails while overlooking the Med followed by a three-course dinner with Leonardo DiCaprio and then a musical performance by Nicki Minaj? Nicki Minaj gave an exclusive performance at the gala (Photo by Timm/face to face/REX/Shutterstock) But while the celebs were clearly enjoying themselves – because, well who wouldn’t? – they were ultimately there to make a load of money for charity. And you won’t believe what they were selling to do it… More: Scott Disick’s ‘love interest’ Bella Thorne ditches ‘fancy’ Cannes parties – and DENIES romance to fans As exclusive chef, Robert Cavalli gave us all a sneak peak into the auction gifts, he shared pictures of what the ultra rich could buy with their hard-earned cash. First up was a private football match with none other than David Beckham – oh yeah, and it’s in Paris! The snap of the gift description even states you and your teammates get to go for dinner and drinks with the former England player afterwards. Check it out for yourself! As well as a date with Becks, other auction prizes include a holiday to  the Maldives for 60 people, a 1958 Jaguar signed by DiCaprio as well as a chance to meet the Dalai Lama on a trip to India. Not exactly you’re average charity auction, ey? While it’s reported that a footie game with David went for a cool £300,000, the most expensive lot at the auction was a collection of glamorous dresses that ended up going for over £2.5million. Wow! It was all for a good cause though as the celebs managed to raise over £150million for HIV and AIDS research. And if whoever bought the trip to the Maldives has trouble filling those 60 spaces – the team here at Now would be more than happy to assist… The post Trip to the Maldives and footie with Beckham?! Inside the extravagant auction at Cannes amfAR gala appeared first on CelebsNow. [...]
Fri, May 26, 2017
Source: Celeb News